Generous
Structures
Catherine Wagley
Put on a Happy Face:
On Dynasty Handbag
Travis Diehl
The Limits of Animality:
Simone Forti at ISCP
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
More Wound Than Ruin:
Evaluating the
"Human Condition"
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Brenna Youngblood
Todd Gray
Rafa Esparza
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Creature by Thomas Duncan
Sam Pulitzer & Peter Wachtler by Stuart Krimko
Karl Haendel by Aaron Horst
Wolfgang Tillmans by Eli Diner
Ma by Claire de Dobay Rifelj
The Rat Bastard Protective Association by Pablo Lopez
Kenneth Tam
's Basement
Travis Diehl
The Female
Cool School
Catherine Wagley
The Rise
of the L.A.
Art Witch
Amanda Yates Garcia
Interview with
Mernet Larsen
Julie Weitz
Agnes Martin
at LACMA
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party Carla Issue 6
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Analia Saban
Ry Rocklen
Sarah Cain
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews:
Made in L.A. 2016
Doug Aitken Electric Earth
Mertzbau

Jean-Pascal Flavian and Mika Tajima
Mark A. Rodruigez
The Weeping Line
Molly Larkey, Aaron Horst,
Keith J. Varadi, Katie Bode,
Stuart Krimko, Matt Stromberg
Non-Fiction
at The Underground Museum
Catherine Wagley
The Art of Birth Carmen Winant
Escape from Bunker Hill
John Knight
at REDCAT
Travis Diehl
Ed Boreal Speaks Benjamin Lord
Art Advice (from Men) Sarah Weber
Routine Pleasures
at the MAK Center
Jonathan Griffin
Launch Party Carla Issue 5
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Fay Ray
John Baldessari
Claire Kennedy
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Hana Cohn, Eli Diner,
Claire De Dobay Rifelj,
Katie Bode, Molly Larkey,
Keith J. Varadi
Moon, laub, and Love Catherine Wagley
Walk Artisanal Jonathan Griffin
Reconsidering
Marva Marrow's
Inside the L.A. Artist
Anthony Pearson
Mystery Science Thater
Diana Thater
at LACMA
Aaron Horst
Informal Feminisms Federica Bueti and Jan Verwoert
Marva Marrow Photographs
Lita Albuquerque
Launch Party Carla Issue 4
Interiors and Interiority:
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Char Jansen
Reviews Claire de Dobay Rifelj,
Matt Stromberg, Hana Cohn,
Lindsay Preston Zappas,
Simone Krug, Keith Vaughn,
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Le Louvre, Las Vegas Evan Moffitt
iPhones, Flesh,
and the Word
F.B.I.
at Arturo Bandini
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Women Talking About Barney Catherine Wagley
Lingua Ignota
Faith Wilding
at The Armory Center
for the Arts
and LOUDHAILER
Benjamin Lord
A Conversation
with Amalia Ulman
Char Jansen
How We Practice Carmen Winant
Launch Party Carla Issue 3
Share Your Piece of the Puzzle Federica Bueti
Amanda Ross-Ho Photographs
Erik Frydenborg
Reviews Eli Diner, Jonathan Griffin,
Don Edler, Aaron Horst
Hot Tears Carmen Winant
Slow View:
Molly Larkey
Anna Breininger and Kate Whitlock
Americanicity's Paintings
Orion Martin
at Favorite Goods
Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal
Layers of Leimert Park Catherine Wagley
Junkspace Junk Food
Parker Ito
at Kaldi, Smart Objects,
White Cube, and
Château Shatto
Evan Moffitt
Melrose Hustle Keith Vaughn
Reviews Benjamin Lord, Aaron Horst, Stephen Kent
Top-Down Bottom-Up Jenny Gagalka
Snap Reviews Aaron Horst, Char Jansen, Randy Rice, Lindsay Preston Zappas
Max Maslansky Photographs
Monica Majoli
at the Tom of Finland Foundation
White Lee, Black Lee
William Pope.L’s Reenactor
Travis Diehl
Dora Budor Interview Char Jensen
MEAT PHYSICS/
Metaphysical L.A.
Travis Diehl
Art for Art’s Sake:
L.A. in the 1990s
Anthony Pearson
A Dialogue in Two
Synchronous Atmospheres
Erik Morse
with Alexandra Grant
SOGTFO
at François Ghebaly
Jonathan Griffin
#studio #visit
with #devin #kenny
@barnettcohen
Mateo Tannatt
Photographs
Jibade-Khalil Huffman
VESSEL // CINS and
VESSEL // PERF
Ben Medansky
I've been a lot of places,
seen so many faces
Nora Slade
Launch Party Carla Issue 1
Slow View:
Discussion on One Work
Anna Breininger
with Julian Rogers
Reviews Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal, Catherine Wagley, Keith Vaughn, Aaron Horst, Kate Wolf, Mateo Tannatt, Evan Moffitt, Cal Siegel
We’re in This Together Lauren Cherry & Max Springer
Distribution
Downtown
ARTBOOK @ Hauser Wirth
    & Schimmel
917 E. 3rd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Baert Gallery
2441 Hunter St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Central Park
412 W. 6th St. #615
Los Angeles, CA 90014

CES Gallery
711 Mateo St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Cirrus Gallery
2011 S. Santa Fe Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Château Shatto
406 W. Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Club Pro
1525 S. Main St.
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Fahrenheit
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Ghebaly Gallery
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

The Geffen Contemporary
    & at MOCA
152 N. Central Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Harmony Murphy
358 E. 2nd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

LACA
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

MAMA
1242 Palmetto St.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Mistake Room
1811 E. 20th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90058

MOCA Grand Avenue
250 S. Grand Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Monte Vista Projects
1206 Maple Avenue, #523
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Night Gallery
2276 E. 16th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

The Box
805 Traction Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Wilding Cran Gallery
939 S. Santa Fe Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Chinatown
A.G. Geiger
502 Chung King Ct.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Charlie James
969 Chung King Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

EMBASSY
422 Ord St., Suite G
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Human Resources
410 Cottage Home St.
Los Angeles CA, 90012

Ooga Booga
943 N. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Mid-City
1301PE
6150 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Big Pictures Los Angeles
2424 W Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

California African American Museum
600 State Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90037

Chainlink Gallery
1051 S. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

Commonwealth and Council
3006 W. 7th St. #220
Los Angeles CA 90005

David Kordansky Gallery
5130 W. Edgewood Pl.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

HILDE
4727 W. Washington
Los Angeles, CA 90016

JOAN
4300 W. Jefferson Blvd. #1
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Kayne Griffin Corcoran
1201 S. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

ltd Los Angeles
1119 S. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

Marc Foxx
6150 Wilshire Blvd. #5
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Martos Gallery
3315 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

Ms. Barbers
5370 W. Adams Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Ochi Projects
3301 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

The Landing
5118 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Park View
836 S. Park View St. Unit 8
Los Angeles, CA 90057

Skibum MacArthur
712 S. Grand View St., #204
Los Angeles, CA 90057

SPRÜTH MAGERS
5900 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

The Underground Museum
3508 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

VACANCY
2524 1/2 James M. Wood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90006

Visitor Welcome Center
3006 W. 7th St., Suite #200A
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Culver City
Anat Ebgi
2660 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Arcana Books
8675 W. Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Blum and Poe
2727 S. La Cienega
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Cherry and Martin
2712 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Honor Fraser
2622 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Klowden Mann
6023 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Luis De Jesus
2685 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

MiM Gallery
2636 La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Roberts and Tilton
5801 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Samuel Freeman
2639 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Susanne Vielmetter
6006 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232
Silverlake/ Echo Park
Smart Objects
1828 W. Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90026

Otherwild
1768 N. Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Hollywood
Diane Rosenstein
831 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Family Books
436 N. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

GAVLAK
1034 N. Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Hannah Hoffman
1010 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

LAXART
7000 Santa Monica Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90038

M+B
612 N. Almont Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90069

Mier
1107 Greenacre Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90046

Moskowitz Bayse
743 N. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Regen Projects
6750 Santa Monica Blvd.
LLos Angeles, CA 90038

Shulamit Nazarian
616 N. La Brea
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Various Small Fires
812 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Westside
18th Street Arts
1639 18th St.
Santa Monica, CA 90404

Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis
    College of Art and Design
9045 Lincoln Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90045

Christopher Grimes Gallery
916 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90401

DXIX Projects
519 Santa Clara Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90291

Five Car Garage
(Emma Gray HQ)

Team (Bungalow)
306 Windward Ave.
Venice, CA 90291
Eastside
67 Steps
2163 Princeton Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90026

ACME.
2939 Denby Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90039

ESXLA
602 Moulton Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90031

SADE
204 S. Avenue 19
Los Angeles, CA 90031
Boyle Heights
BBQLA
2315 Jesse St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Chimento Contemporary
622 S. Anderson St., #105
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ibid.
670 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ooga Twooga
356 Mission Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Parrasch Heijnen Gallery
1326 S. Boyle Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Museum as Retail Space (MaRS)
649 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Nicodim Gallery
571 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Venus Over Los Angeles
601 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023
Pasadena/ Glendale/ Valley
The Armory Center for the Arts
145 N. Raymond Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91103

Los Angeles Valley College
5800 Fulton Ave.
Valley Glen, CA 91401

Natural
15168 Raymer St.
Van Nuys, CA 91405

The Pit
918 Ruberta Ave.
Glendale, CA 91201

L.A. Art Fairs

Art Los Angeles Contemporary

Paramount Ranch

ArtBandini

January 28–31, 2016

Alison O'Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent, (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

Alison O’Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

Though Los Angeles may not be the most convenient art marketplace for the old-school collectors of New York and Europe, it has nonetheless entered the saturated global art fair game. Now firmly established as a major artist enclave, L.A. has done so (at its best moments) with the city’s own brand of sprawl and aesthetic twists.

Three simultaneous fairs sprouted across town the last weekend of January, the largest of which was Art Los Angeles Contemporary (ALAC), now in its seventh year at Santa Monica Airport’s Barker Hangar. Not only did ALAC’s participating galleries hail from more diverse locales than ever (Spain, Argentina, New Zealand, and Korea, among others), this year the fair inaugurated a new section, subtitled “Freeways,” for galleries under four years of age. Did this inject a different vibe into ALAC’s somewhat predictable offerings of mainly large paintings and manageably sized sculptures? Not really.

None of the Freeways booths—though smaller in scale—would have looked out-of-place in the main space, which begs the question of why they were set apart in the first place, and highlights a missed opportunity to shake up tradition, perhaps with a wider variety of mediums and political angles.

Across ALAC were an abundance of vibrantly colored objects, punctuated by works such as Loie Hollowell’s modest canvases (Feuer/Mesler), whose muted palettes and sinuous lines were intriguing in their intimate eroticism. Laure Prouvost’s evocative phrases invoking sweat and the sea (MOT International) were painted in stark white on black. They inspired uneasy daydreams of the hangar, submerged.

Paramount Ranch III, courtesy Freedman Fitzpatrick and Paradise Garage, Los Angeles, photo by Michael Underwood.

Paramount Ranch III. Image courtesy of Freedman Fitzpatrick and Paradise Garage, Los Angeles. Photo: Michael Underwood.

Certain galleries tinkered with their allotted real estate. New York’s The Hole papered its walls with a reproduction of Photoshop’s moiré background pattern, treating the art objects hung atop it like so many interchangeable JPEGs. L.A.’s own Various Small Fires adopted a beach theme, with works in pastel and neon hues, and surfing-related text by Andrea Longacre-White strewn across the walls graffiti-style.

Of course the hot spot for unconventional fair presentations for the last three years has been Paramount Ranch. Named for its site—a former Old West set—it was founded by galleries Freedman Fitzpatrick and Paradise Garage, the latter run by artists Liz Craft and Pentti Monkkonen. Equally ambitious as ALAC in the internationalism of its participating venues, Paramount Ranch’s venue forces galleries to adapt to awkward spaces (the jail, the engulfing barn), and in doing so, gives off an anything-goes aura amidst wooden cabins and dusty walkways. One feels something like a trespasser; a sensation promoted by the park rangers warily patrolling their transformed stomping ground.

The most memorable installations here usually fall into two opposing categories. In the first, unconventional objects occupy the ranch’s more conventional-looking spaces—as was the case with Paulo Monteiro’s quirky painting-sculptures (Mendes Wood DM), which transformed a plain, four-walled room into a poetic minefield of color and form. On the other end of this spectrum are typical-seeming objects placed in unexpected settings, such as Eirik Senje’s gouache paintings (1857 gallery), hung outdoors on a cluster of makeshift plaster walls that recalled portals or large tombstones. Paul McCarthy’s imposing inflatable buttplug (Tree, 2014) belonged to this latter group on a grandiose scale; its green inflated tip rose above the tree line, a beacon to approaching visitors.

Opening of ArtBandini (installation view), January 29, 2016. Courtesy of Arturo Bandini, Los Angeles.

Opening of ArtBandini (installation view) (2016). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini, Los Angeles.

Despite its popularity—or in fact because of it—this was the final year of Paramount Ranch, as its organizers want to end on a high note. This lends bittersweet irony to the fact that strong rains nearly shut down the event on its last day. The same storm canceled completely the final day of ArtBandini, a third concurrent (and one-time-only) fair organized by artists Isaac Resnikoff and Michael Dopp. The fair was the logical progression of their coltish enterprise, Arturo Bandini, a gallery-in-a-shack-in-a-parking-lot in Cypress Park. Over two-dozen entities—some real galleries, and others invented for the occasion­—shared only a handful of walls, but brought carloads of supporters. Participants reveled in the common knowledge that Los Angeles is the ideal city for such shenanigans: it (still) has enough affordable spaces for larger experimental efforts, but enough cred as an art center for such diversions to be taken seriously.

Most enjoyable as a mini-installation was that by newly minted Animals With Human Rights Humans With Animal Rights (Nick Kramer), in which an intimate assortment of works by fellow L.A. artists was propped unceremoniously atop aluminum grids and a folding table; the work ready to be hawked as salable wares. Nearby a collaborative enterprise called L.A. Ashtrays (Edgar Bryan and Scott Reeder) presented malformed but useable ceramic receptacles upon a lilac-colored coffin. Their crisp, attractive posters provided only hazy hints as to the trademark’s raison d’être.

Animals With Human Rights Humans With Animal Rights booth at ArtBandini (installation view), January 29­-31, 2016. Courtesy of Arturo Bandini, Los Angeles.

Animals With Human Rights Humans With Animal Rights booth at ArtBandini (installation view) (2016). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini, Los Angeles.

The relationship between the larger, traditional fair and its more provisional offshoots has been symbiotic: ALAC offered the preliminary impetus for art-viewers to spend a weekend perusing aesthetic wares (whether traveling crosstown or cross-country to do so); which Paramount Ranch took advantage of in organizing its first iteration; whose success in turn generated more enthusiasm for ALAC’s subsequent annual presentations. ArtBandini fed upon this cycle as well, drawing fair-goers Eastward for further, and more affordable, artistic encounters.

Since Paramount and ArtBandini will not be returning, however, it remains to be seen whether ALAC drew its largest crowds and collectors this year on the strength of its own offerings, or whether the light-hearted irreverence of the satellite presentations provided a crucial attractive balance. Signs such as ALAC’s inclusion of a lively performance by Compton’s Centennial High School marching band—orchestrated by artist Alison O’Daniel with the non-profit, JOAN—as well as a marvelously convoluted “three way” rotating installation organized by Dave Muller (Blum & Poe), Brian Sharp (ROGERS), and Jon Pylypchuk (Grice Bench), imply that the now-disappeared sideshows have indeed left their mark.

Alison O'Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent, (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

Alison O’Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

Alison O'Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent, (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

Alison O’Daniel, Centennial Marching Band Forwards, Backwards, Pause, Silent (documentation of performance) (2016). Organized by JOAN, Los Angeles, for Art Los Angeles Contemporary, January 28, 2016, Photo: Gina Clyne.

2016-07-12 (3)Originally published in Carla Issue 4.