Kanye Westworld Travis Diehl
@richardhawkins01 Thomas Duncan
Support Structures: Alice Könitz and LAMOA Catherine Wagley
Interview with Penny Slinger Eliza Swann
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
taisha paggett
Ashley Hunt
Young Chung
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Letter to the Editor
Launch Party
Reviews Alessandro Pessoli
by Jonathan Griffin

Jennie Jieun Lee
by Stuart Krimko

Trisha Baga
by Lindsay Preston Zappas

Jimmie Durham
by Molly Larkey

Parallel City
by Hana Cohn

Jason Rhodes
by Matt Stromberg
Generous
Structures
Catherine Wagley
Put on a Happy Face:
On Dynasty Handbag
Travis Diehl
The Limits of Animality:
Simone Forti at ISCP
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
More Wound Than Ruin:
Evaluating the
"Human Condition"
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Brenna Youngblood
Todd Gray
Rafa Esparza
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Creature by Thomas Duncan
Sam Pulitzer & Peter Wachtler by Stuart Krimko
Karl Haendel by Aaron Horst
Wolfgang Tillmans by Eli Diner
Ma by Claire de Dobay Rifelj
The Rat Bastard Protective Association by Pablo Lopez
Kenneth Tam
's Basement
Travis Diehl
The Female
Cool School
Catherine Wagley
The Rise
of the L.A.
Art Witch
Amanda Yates Garcia
Interview with
Mernet Larsen
Julie Weitz
Agnes Martin
at LACMA
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party Carla Issue 6
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Analia Saban
Ry Rocklen
Sarah Cain
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews:
Made in L.A. 2016
Doug Aitken Electric Earth
Mertzbau

Jean-Pascal Flavian and Mika Tajima
Mark A. Rodruigez
The Weeping Line
Molly Larkey, Aaron Horst,
Keith J. Varadi, Katie Bode,
Stuart Krimko, Matt Stromberg
Non-Fiction
at The Underground Museum
Catherine Wagley
The Art of Birth Carmen Winant
Escape from Bunker Hill
John Knight
at REDCAT
Travis Diehl
Ed Boreal Speaks Benjamin Lord
Art Advice (from Men) Sarah Weber
Routine Pleasures
at the MAK Center
Jonathan Griffin
Launch Party Carla Issue 5
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Fay Ray
John Baldessari
Claire Kennedy
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Hana Cohn, Eli Diner,
Claire De Dobay Rifelj,
Katie Bode, Molly Larkey,
Keith J. Varadi
Moon, laub, and Love Catherine Wagley
Walk Artisanal Jonathan Griffin
Reconsidering
Marva Marrow's
Inside the L.A. Artist
Anthony Pearson
Mystery Science Thater
Diana Thater
at LACMA
Aaron Horst
Informal Feminisms Federica Bueti and Jan Verwoert
Marva Marrow Photographs
Lita Albuquerque
Launch Party Carla Issue 4
Interiors and Interiority:
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Char Jansen
Reviews Claire de Dobay Rifelj,
Matt Stromberg, Hana Cohn,
Lindsay Preston Zappas,
Simone Krug, Keith Vaughn,
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Le Louvre, Las Vegas Evan Moffitt
iPhones, Flesh,
and the Word
F.B.I.
at Arturo Bandini
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Women Talking About Barney Catherine Wagley
Lingua Ignota
Faith Wilding
at The Armory Center
for the Arts
and LOUDHAILER
Benjamin Lord
A Conversation
with Amalia Ulman
Char Jansen
How We Practice Carmen Winant
Launch Party Carla Issue 3
Share Your Piece of the Puzzle Federica Bueti
Amanda Ross-Ho Photographs
Erik Frydenborg
Reviews Eli Diner, Jonathan Griffin,
Don Edler, Aaron Horst
Hot Tears Carmen Winant
Slow View:
Molly Larkey
Anna Breininger and Kate Whitlock
Americanicity's Paintings
Orion Martin
at Favorite Goods
Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal
Layers of Leimert Park Catherine Wagley
Junkspace Junk Food
Parker Ito
at Kaldi, Smart Objects,
White Cube, and
Château Shatto
Evan Moffitt
Melrose Hustle Keith Vaughn
Reviews Benjamin Lord, Aaron Horst, Stephen Kent
Top-Down Bottom-Up Jenny Gagalka
Snap Reviews Aaron Horst, Char Jansen, Randy Rice, Lindsay Preston Zappas
Max Maslansky Photographs
Monica Majoli
at the Tom of Finland Foundation
White Lee, Black Lee
William Pope.L’s Reenactor
Travis Diehl
Dora Budor Interview Char Jensen
MEAT PHYSICS/
Metaphysical L.A.
Travis Diehl
Art for Art’s Sake:
L.A. in the 1990s
Anthony Pearson
A Dialogue in Two
Synchronous Atmospheres
Erik Morse
with Alexandra Grant
SOGTFO
at François Ghebaly
Jonathan Griffin
#studio #visit
with #devin #kenny
@barnettcohen
Mateo Tannatt
Photographs
Jibade-Khalil Huffman
VESSEL // CINS and
VESSEL // PERF
Ben Medansky
I've been a lot of places,
seen so many faces
Nora Slade
Launch Party Carla Issue 1
Slow View:
Discussion on One Work
Anna Breininger
with Julian Rogers
Reviews Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal, Catherine Wagley, Keith Vaughn, Aaron Horst, Kate Wolf, Mateo Tannatt, Evan Moffitt, Cal Siegel
We’re in This Together Lauren Cherry & Max Springer
Distribution
Downtown
ARTBOOK @ Hauser Wirth
    & Schimmel
917 E. 3rd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Baert Gallery
2441 Hunter St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Central Park
412 W. 6th St. #615
Los Angeles, CA 90014

CES Gallery
711 Mateo St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Cirrus Gallery
2011 S. Santa Fe Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Château Shatto
406 W. Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Club Pro
1525 S. Main St.
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Fahrenheit
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Ghebaly Gallery
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

The Geffen Contemporary
    & at MOCA
152 N. Central Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Harmony Murphy
358 E. 2nd St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

LACA
2245 E. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

MAMA
1242 Palmetto St.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Mistake Room
1811 E. 20th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90058

MOCA Grand Avenue
250 S. Grand Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Monte Vista Projects
1206 Maple Avenue, #523
Los Angeles, CA 90015

Night Gallery
2276 E. 16th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90021

The Box
805 Traction Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Wilding Cran Gallery
939 S. Santa Fe Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Chinatown
A.G. Geiger
502 Chung King Ct.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Charlie James
969 Chung King Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

EMBASSY
422 Ord St., Suite G
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Human Resources
410 Cottage Home St.
Los Angeles CA, 90012

Ooga Booga
943 N. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Mid-City
1301PE
6150 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Big Pictures Los Angeles
2424 W Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

California African American Museum
600 State Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90037

Chainlink Gallery
1051 S. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

Commonwealth and Council
3006 W. 7th St. #220
Los Angeles CA 90005

David Kordansky Gallery
5130 W. Edgewood Pl.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

HILDE
4727 W. Washington
Los Angeles, CA 90016

JOAN
4300 W. Jefferson Blvd. #1
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Kayne Griffin Corcoran
1201 S. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

ltd Los Angeles
1119 S. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

Marc Foxx
6150 Wilshire Blvd. #5
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Martos Gallery
3315 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

Ms. Barbers
5370 W. Adams Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Ochi Projects
3301 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

The Landing
5118 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Park View
836 S. Park View St. Unit 8
Los Angeles, CA 90057

Skibum MacArthur
712 S. Grand View St., #204
Los Angeles, CA 90057

SPRÜTH MAGERS
5900 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

The Underground Museum
3508 W. Washington Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90018

VACANCY
2524 1/2 James M. Wood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90006

Visitor Welcome Center
3006 W. 7th St., Suite #200A
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Culver City
Anat Ebgi
2660 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Arcana Books
8675 W. Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Blum and Poe
2727 S. La Cienega
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Cherry and Martin
2712 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Honor Fraser
2622 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Klowden Mann
6023 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Luis De Jesus
2685 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

MiM Gallery
2636 La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Roberts and Tilton
5801 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Samuel Freeman
2639 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034

Susanne Vielmetter
6006 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232
Silverlake/ Echo Park
Smart Objects
1828 W. Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90026

Otherwild
1768 N. Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90021
Hollywood
Diane Rosenstein
831 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Family Books
436 N. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

GAVLAK
1034 N. Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Hannah Hoffman
1010 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

LAXART
7000 Santa Monica Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90038

M+B
612 N. Almont Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90069

Mier
1107 Greenacre Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90046

Moskowitz Bayse
743 N. La Brea Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038

Regen Projects
6750 Santa Monica Blvd.
LLos Angeles, CA 90038

Shulamit Nazarian
616 N. La Brea
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Various Small Fires
812 Highland Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Westside
18th Street Arts
1639 18th St.
Santa Monica, CA 90404

Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis
    College of Art and Design
9045 Lincoln Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90045

Christopher Grimes Gallery
916 Colorado Ave.
Santa Monica, CA 90401

DXIX Projects
519 Santa Clara Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90291

Five Car Garage
(Emma Gray HQ)

Team (Bungalow)
306 Windward Ave.
Venice, CA 90291
Eastside
67 Steps
2163 Princeton Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90026

ACME.
2939 Denby Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90039

ESXLA
602 Moulton Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90031

SADE
204 S. Avenue 19
Los Angeles, CA 90031
Boyle Heights
BBQLA
2315 Jesse St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Chimento Contemporary
622 S. Anderson St., #105
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ibid.
670 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ooga Twooga
356 Mission Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Parrasch Heijnen Gallery
1326 S. Boyle Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Museum as Retail Space (MaRS)
649 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Nicodim Gallery
571 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Venus Over Los Angeles
601 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023
Pasadena/ Glendale/ Valley
The Armory Center for the Arts
145 N. Raymond Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91103

Los Angeles Valley College
5800 Fulton Ave.
Valley Glen, CA 91401

Natural
15168 Raymer St.
Van Nuys, CA 91405

The Pit
918 Ruberta Ave.
Glendale, CA 91201

Dora Budor Interview

Dora Budor, The Architect's Plan, His Contagion, and Sensitive Corridors (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of the artist and New Galerie.

Dora Budor, The Architect’s Plan, His Contagion, and Sensitive Corridors (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of the artist and New Galerie.

The stereotypical view of Hollywood is a scintillating dystopia, where the produce is 100% organic and the people are 100% plastic.

Even though she visited Los Angeles for the first time just this month (for a screening she curated at Flax Fahrenheit), Dora Budor’s works are a perfect reflection on that Hollywood real/fake hybridity. She is interested in virtually every aspect of Hollywood, its materials, ideological aspects and how we react to them. Her carnal sculptures and installations are anthropomorphic renderings of film props and prosthetics, resembling something like physical CGI or special effects transformed into a tactile reality, her work seems to have fallen off the screen of a blockbuster movie.

Talking on the phone with Dora about Hollywood—an industry, a phenomenon, and a place that inspires her practice—got me excited about things I have previously been reviled by: Elysian, blood splatters, and decaying zombie flesh.

Dora Budor, Our Children Will Have Yellow Eyes (2015). Screen-used miniature living container from Johnny Mnemonic (1995), steel armature, epoxy clay, infected silicone prosthetics, acrylic polymer with pigment suspension, sfx and weathering paint, assorted metal hardware. Image courtesy the artist and New Galerie, Paris in collaboration with NOIRMONTARTPRODUCTION.

Dora Budor, Our Children Will Have Yellow Eyes (2015). Screen-used miniature living container from Johnny Mnemonic (1995), steel armature, epoxy clay, infected silicone prosthetics, acrylic polymer with pigment suspension, sfx and weathering paint, assorted metal hardware. Image courtesy the artist and New Galerie, Paris in collaboration with NOIRMONTARTPRODUCTION.

Char Jansen: I’m in Chinatown in L.A., and you’re in Chinatown in NYC. It makes me think of that John Carpenter movie, Big Trouble in Little China.

Dora Budor: There is something about John Carpenter movies that really drive me nuts. I think it’s the way he imposes ‘80s driving music onto every single scene, and then whenever anyone starts talking he just lowers the volume. It’s like there’s a radio playing next to your head all the time…

CJ: Lol. I guess I was thinking about that peculiar exchange of culture that happens between Hollywood and Eastern film production companies.

DB: One of my favorite movies last year was Snowpiercer. It’s a Korean-Hollywood production of a feature film by Joon-ho Bong, who made it after finding this French graphic novel called Le Transperceneige about the only survivors of frozen apocalypse on a train endlessly circling the globe. It’s incredible because it has all the Hollywood tropes, but it’s acted out in a super hysterical way, with very exaggerated emotion—people are laughing and screaming it’s like Kabuki theatre—it’s almost too much for the screen. But when this very specific Asian treatment (influenced by history and theatre) protrudes through the glossy Hollywood surface it becomes really interesting.

CJ: Funny you use the word ‘protrudes’, because in your work you often seem to perform dissections, exposing all the layers that might lie beneath a surface or skin.

DB: Recently I’ve been making new sculptures reusing screen-used architectural miniatures from The Fifth Element, Batman Returns and Johnny Mnemonic. The miniatures are captivating, and strange. They are all made to look aged, and document the passing of real time. The oldest one is 20 years old, so it shows actual wear and tear. You can see that the layers of what is supposed to be rooftop tiles are made out of pieces of sandpaper that have come unglued. All of them have been physically weathered in different ways with this dystopian filter added onto them: they often represent our future environment as very derelict, because of too much pollution, global warming, or some other catastrophe.

Today, with CGI, the first sculpting layer is always a pristine surface, and then layers of weathering and dust are added on top. There’s an interesting reference between reality and fiction with this type of aging because in order to believe and connect with the narrative, the cinematic environments have to have a history as well as a present. They need to look as though they have been lived in, or touched by a human/alien hand. But in real life, when something that has aged too much, we have an urge to replace it, or we want to repaint it, iron out the wrinkles. Or treat it with botox.

Dora Budor, The Architect,...(number 6) (2015). SFX transfer scars from the movie 300: Rise of an Empire, silicone sheet, silicone cast wiring, electrical fittings, stainless steel, and assorted metal hardware, 76.5 x 122.5 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Various Small Fires.

Dora Budor, The Architect,…(number 6) (2015). SFX transfer scars from the movie 300: Rise of an Empire, silicone sheet, silicone cast wiring, electrical fittings, stainless steel, and assorted metal hardware, 76.5 x 122.5 inches. Image courtesy of the artist and Various Small Fires.

CJ: You seem interested in drawing analogies between the human and the nonhuman. Your current work up at Various Small Fires, as part of the exhibition The Slick and The Sticky, reveals the hidden electrical infrastructures in the gallery building, turning the walls inside-out to expose this network of veins carrying energy.

DB: I’m interested in bringing objects to life, or to the point they start to resemble life—sort of like when you see zombies reanimated and you think “oh they’re alive, but there is something really off about them.” Many interesting characters in films are created from parts of different bodies. I like partialized objects like that, different types of hybrids of us and our image.

For my installation at Swiss Institute in New York I’m texturing the walls and floor with the black goo that resembles the kind you’d find in a sci-fi film, this type of black matter that can contain life—like in Prometheus, it contains an alien DNA structure that can reanimate, or like in X-files it’s ‘the black cancer’ that invades another body. I read recently that in Chinchorro, mummies that have been preserved for 7,000 years are starting to decompose into black slime. Because of global warming, the bacteria buried in their mummified skin has come back to life. Once understood as dead, biological and ecological forces have suddenly revived these ancient bodies in a Frankensteinian way—a symbolic indication of the current moment.

CJ: How do you manage to get so deep behind the scenes of Hollywood?

DB: I’m a bit of a film nerd when it comes to production and “making-of” footage. I find breaking down Hollywood visuals one of the most beautiful things in the world.

But it’s almost more interesting to look at what the fans are obsessed with, what scene produces an emotional effect or which character is particularly problematic for them. The audience tells you how it works: what excites us, what emotions trigger us. Or, why do we want violence? What form do we enjoy most? Films with super high box office ratings often contain a theatrical kind of violence. American movies in the ‘70s and ‘80s used to be about guns and knives, it was more realistic, but now there’s incredible versatility to it. The different types of blood splatter you can get in CGI are like a science all of their own.

CJ: So has looking at the audience reactions to these mainstream movies affected how you make art, and for whom?

DB: I don’t make art for the gallery, or at least don’t perceive that to be the ultimate purpose of it. I’m making sculpture now, but that’s not to say I might not make a mainstream movie one day. What I find exhilarating about mainstream film is that it becomes part of collective consciousness. Certain events, fictional or real, feel as though we’ve been through them, and we re-experience them by triggering the subconscious. That’s how I approach making art.

CJ: You’d rather go to a movie than to a gallery.

DB: I don’t want it to sound like I’m dissing art, but I rarely find inspiration looking at art. Being involved in this thing that is so different makes my brain way more open. I guess I tend to move more towards creating environments, an overall experience that is static, but can give a feeling like a movie does. I am always thinking about how I can make a movie without using moving image, to create a film without film.

CJ: Many people criticize Hollywood and the effect of “Hollywoodification” on culture.

DB: I think Hollywood is absolutely amazing. It’s so democratic and so undemocratic at the same time. It’s a playground for exploring all the ideas in the world, almost without limits. Of course it has this completely rotten infrastructure and it is a money-making machine, but what is being created in spite of this is incredible.

Dora Budor, One Million Years of Feeling Nothing (2015). Screen-used miniature living garages from The Fifth Element (1997), steel armature, epoxy, clay, diseased latex prosthetics, acrylic polymer with pigment suspension, SFX and weathering paint, assorted metal hardware. Image courtesy the artist and New Galerie, Paris in collaboration with NOIRMONTARTPRODUCTION.

Dora Budor, One Million Years of Feeling Nothing (2015). Screen-used miniature living garages from The Fifth Element (1997), steel armature, epoxy, clay, diseased latex prosthetics, acrylic polymer with pigment suspension, SFX and weathering paint, assorted metal hardware. Image courtesy the artist and New Galerie, Paris in collaboration with NOIRMONTARTPRODUCTION.

Originally Published in Carla Issue 2