Kanye Westworld Travis Diehl
@richardhawkins01 Thomas Duncan
Support Structures: Alice Könitz and LAMOA Catherine Wagley
Interview with Penny Slinger Eliza Swann
Exquisite L.A.
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taisha paggett
Ashley Hunt
Young Chung
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Letter to the Editor
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Jennie Jieun Lee
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Trisha Baga
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Jimmie Durham
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Parallel City
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Jason Rhodes
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Generous
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Catherine Wagley
Put on a Happy Face:
On Dynasty Handbag
Travis Diehl
The Limits of Animality:
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Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
More Wound Than Ruin:
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Jessica Simmons
Launch Party
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
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Todd Gray
Rafa Esparza
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
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Ma by Claire de Dobay Rifelj
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Kenneth Tam
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Travis Diehl
The Female
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Catherine Wagley
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Amanda Yates Garcia
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Agnes Martin
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Jessica Simmons
Launch Party Carla Issue 6
Exquisite L.A.
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Ry Rocklen
Sarah Cain
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
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Reviews:
Made in L.A. 2016
Doug Aitken Electric Earth
Mertzbau

Jean-Pascal Flavian and Mika Tajima
Mark A. Rodruigez
The Weeping Line
Molly Larkey, Aaron Horst,
Keith J. Varadi, Katie Bode,
Stuart Krimko, Matt Stromberg
Non-Fiction
at The Underground Museum
Catherine Wagley
The Art of Birth Carmen Winant
Escape from Bunker Hill
John Knight
at REDCAT
Travis Diehl
Ed Boreal Speaks Benjamin Lord
Art Advice (from Men) Sarah Weber
Routine Pleasures
at the MAK Center
Jonathan Griffin
Launch Party Carla Issue 5
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Fay Ray
John Baldessari
Claire Kennedy
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Hana Cohn, Eli Diner,
Claire De Dobay Rifelj,
Katie Bode, Molly Larkey,
Keith J. Varadi
Moon, laub, and Love Catherine Wagley
Walk Artisanal Jonathan Griffin
Reconsidering
Marva Marrow's
Inside the L.A. Artist
Anthony Pearson
Mystery Science Thater
Diana Thater
at LACMA
Aaron Horst
Informal Feminisms Federica Bueti and Jan Verwoert
Marva Marrow Photographs
Lita Albuquerque
Launch Party Carla Issue 4
Interiors and Interiority:
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Char Jansen
Reviews Claire de Dobay Rifelj,
Matt Stromberg, Hana Cohn,
Lindsay Preston Zappas,
Simone Krug, Keith Vaughn,
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Le Louvre, Las Vegas Evan Moffitt
iPhones, Flesh,
and the Word
F.B.I.
at Arturo Bandini
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Women Talking About Barney Catherine Wagley
Lingua Ignota
Faith Wilding
at The Armory Center
for the Arts
and LOUDHAILER
Benjamin Lord
A Conversation
with Amalia Ulman
Char Jansen
How We Practice Carmen Winant
Launch Party Carla Issue 3
Share Your Piece of the Puzzle Federica Bueti
Amanda Ross-Ho Photographs
Erik Frydenborg
Reviews Eli Diner, Jonathan Griffin,
Don Edler, Aaron Horst
Hot Tears Carmen Winant
Slow View:
Molly Larkey
Anna Breininger and Kate Whitlock
Americanicity's Paintings
Orion Martin
at Favorite Goods
Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal
Layers of Leimert Park Catherine Wagley
Junkspace Junk Food
Parker Ito
at Kaldi, Smart Objects,
White Cube, and
Château Shatto
Evan Moffitt
Melrose Hustle Keith Vaughn
Reviews Benjamin Lord, Aaron Horst, Stephen Kent
Top-Down Bottom-Up Jenny Gagalka
Snap Reviews Aaron Horst, Char Jansen, Randy Rice, Lindsay Preston Zappas
Max Maslansky Photographs
Monica Majoli
at the Tom of Finland Foundation
White Lee, Black Lee
William Pope.L’s Reenactor
Travis Diehl
Dora Budor Interview Char Jensen
MEAT PHYSICS/
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Travis Diehl
Art for Art’s Sake:
L.A. in the 1990s
Anthony Pearson
A Dialogue in Two
Synchronous Atmospheres
Erik Morse
with Alexandra Grant
SOGTFO
at François Ghebaly
Jonathan Griffin
#studio #visit
with #devin #kenny
@barnettcohen
Mateo Tannatt
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Jibade-Khalil Huffman
VESSEL // CINS and
VESSEL // PERF
Ben Medansky
I've been a lot of places,
seen so many faces
Nora Slade
Launch Party Carla Issue 1
Slow View:
Discussion on One Work
Anna Breininger
with Julian Rogers
Reviews Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal, Catherine Wagley, Keith Vaughn, Aaron Horst, Kate Wolf, Mateo Tannatt, Evan Moffitt, Cal Siegel
We’re in This Together Lauren Cherry & Max Springer
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406 W. Pico Blvd.
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2245 E. Washington Blvd.
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1206 Maple Avenue, #523
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2276 E. 16th St.
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2424 W Washington Blvd.
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1051 S. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90019

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5130 W. Edgewood Pl.
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HILDE
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JOAN
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Kayne Griffin Corcoran
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ltd Los Angeles
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Marc Foxx
6150 Wilshire Blvd. #5
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Ms. Barbers
5370 W. Adams Blvd.
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Ochi Projects
3301 W. Washington Blvd.
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6150 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90048

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5900 Wilshire Blvd.
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3508 W. Washington Blvd.
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Culver City, CA 90232

Luis De Jesus
2685 S. La Cienega Blvd.
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Roberts and Tilton
5801 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Samuel Freeman
2639 S. La Cienega Blvd.
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6006 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232
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Hannah Hoffman
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West Hollywood, CA 90038

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743 N. La Brea Ave.
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6750 Santa Monica Blvd.
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Shulamit Nazarian
616 N. La Brea
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Various Small Fires
812 Highland Ave.
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Santa Monica, CA 90404

Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis
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9045 Lincoln Blvd.
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204 S. Avenue 19
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Chimento Contemporary
622 S. Anderson St., #105
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ibid.
670 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Ooga Twooga
356 Mission Rd.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Parrasch Heijnen Gallery
1326 S. Boyle Ave.
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Museum as Retail Space (MaRS)
649 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Nicodim Gallery
571 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90033

Venus Over Los Angeles
601 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023
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The Armory Center for the Arts
145 N. Raymond Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91103

Los Angeles Valley College
5800 Fulton Ave.
Valley Glen, CA 91401

Natural
15168 Raymer St.
Van Nuys, CA 91405

The Pit
918 Ruberta Ave.
Glendale, CA 91201

Kahlil Joseph:
Double Conscience

at MOCA

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.

 

MOCA’s presentation of Kahlil Joseph’s 14-minute film, m.A.A.d. (2014) attempts to validate the cultural importance of this film within a legacy it has been excluded from. The institution’s positing of Joseph’s work as a kind of contemporary version of Jean-Luc Godard does emphasize shared filmmaking techniques (including elements of autobiography, improvisation and atemporal structure), but on the whole the connection seems tenuous and contrived. Part of the struggle discussed in Joseph’s work is the need to treat all culture as complicated, to exist freely, on its own, in its own time, with its own movement. Those wayward alignments with the work of a white European for the purpose of giving institutional context only underlines the implicit whiteness of the museum itself.

Joseph’s recent entry into this white site—first with his music videos in Kara Walker’s 2014 ICA exhibition—has made him an inadvertent image-maker during another critical time for black rights in America. Joseph has been promoted in press as a representative of contemporary African-American culture, someone filling a gap in its iconography. And there is a Manichean dichotomy that preoccupies Double Conscience, evidently inspired by collaborator Kendrick Lamar’s lyrical thematic in his 2012 breakthrough good kid, m.A.A.d city (the album for which this film first appeared as an hour-long version for Lamar’s support act on Kanye West’s 2013 Yeezus tour).

As an autonomous artwork, it communicates as openly as a music video might, with Lamar’s soundtrack constituting a big part of the emotional effect of the images. But what you get here is not a music video. Their portrait of Compton painted on film is an elegiac celebration of the conflict between loyalty and escape: it’s blissfully sad, euphorically melancholy. Affection pours from the screen.

The dialogue with that ongoing conflict in the film’s iconography doesn’t shy away from Compton stereotypes: Joseph shows us gangs, guns, blunts, Hennessey, lowriders, disenfranchised youths. But the standout quality in his treatment of these portraits is a kind of innocence that saves the film from succumbing to cliché: there’s no blood, no sex, and no desire to linger on brutality or violence. Instead, we get deeper sensations from home videos of family gatherings, good kids doing normal activities, gangs fooling around—yet always with a suggestion of fragility—that says as much about collective prejudice as it does about individual choice.

The uneasy feeling that arises from these apparently inconsequential moments is built carefully, through a series of crescendos that are suddenly shattered each time—often by gunshots—before they peak and circle back to start over, never culminating or ending. Multiple voices overlap, characters pass in and out of the frame, then later reappear. Night and day intertwine. As a two-screen projection, the film has some technically astounding moments: parallel panoramas of Los Angeles remind of Gaspar Noe’s pans over Tokyo in Enter The Void.

Subliminally, this doubling effect reminds us of the film’s position, a literal double perspective to reflect this ‘double conscience’. But that perspective isn’t shown to us as an object-spectacle. Joseph’s camera angle throughout puts you inside the frame; riding in the back of a car, standing on the street watching someone dance; waiting in line in a store; diving underwater in a swimming pool with a bunch of adolescents. But then characters look through you and you’re again not quite a part of it: you’re an inside observer, complicit but voiceless, a prescient ghost. Like a good kid in a mad city.

It’s a dissociative feeling like a hard drug experience; perhaps in reference to Lamar’s encounter with PCP, one of two meanings of the acronym m.A.A.d. (“My Angels on Angel Dust”). Joseph’s involvement in the hallucinogenic Hip Hop and LSD rap movement of recent years has clearly left a mark on this film. It is here, in its ethereality, where Joseph finds the most genuine and open expression of a dichotomous feeling of cultural confusion in our generation. It’s an artwork that gives you a vibe; only once experienced, you realize how surprising and rare that is. Despite all the hype this show has received, it does dissolve cynicism, if only for a moment. I walked out feeling the imprint of a warm California sunset felt through a car window.

 

Kahlil Joseph: Double Conscience runs from March 20–August 16, 2015 at MOCA Grand Avenue (250 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90012).

 

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.

 

 

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.

 

 

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.

 

 

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.

 

 

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Kahlil Joseph, m.A.A.d. (2014) (film stills). Two-channel projection. Courtesy of the artist and MOCA. Image: Chayse Irvin.