Women on the Plinth Catherine Wagley
Us & Them, Now & Then:
Reconstituting Group Material
Travis Diehl
The Offerings of EJ Hill
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Interview with Jenni Sorkin Carmen Winant
Letter to the Editor Lady Parts, Lady Arts
Launch Party August 19th at Blum and Poe
Object Project
Featuring: Rebecca Morris,
Linda Stark, Alex Olson
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Photos by Jeff McClane
Reviews Mark Bradford
at the Venice Biennale
by Thomas Duncan

Broken Language
at Shulamiit Nazarian
by Angella d'Avignon

Artists of Color
at the Underground Museum
by Matt Stromberg

Anthony Lepore & Michael Henry Hayden
at Del Vaz Projects
by Aaron Horst

Home
at LACMA
by Simone Krug

Analia Saban at
Sprueth Magers
by Hana Cohn
Kanye Westworld Travis Diehl
@richardhawkins01 Thomas Duncan
Support Structures: Alice Könitz and LAMOA Catherine Wagley
Interview with Penny Slinger Eliza Swann
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
taisha paggett
Ashley Hunt
Young Chung
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Letter to the Editor
Launch Party
Reviews Alessandro Pessoli
by Jonathan Griffin

Jennie Jieun Lee
by Stuart Krimko

Trisha Baga
by Lindsay Preston Zappas

Jimmie Durham
by Molly Larkey

Parallel City
by Hana Cohn

Jason Rhodes
by Matt Stromberg
Generous
Structures
Catherine Wagley
Put on a Happy Face:
On Dynasty Handbag
Travis Diehl
The Limits of Animality:
Simone Forti at ISCP
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
More Wound Than Ruin:
Evaluating the
"Human Condition"
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Brenna Youngblood
Todd Gray
Rafa Esparza
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Creature by Thomas Duncan
Sam Pulitzer & Peter Wachtler by Stuart Krimko
Karl Haendel by Aaron Horst
Wolfgang Tillmans by Eli Diner
Ma by Claire de Dobay Rifelj
The Rat Bastard Protective Association by Pablo Lopez
Kenneth Tam
's Basement
Travis Diehl
The Female
Cool School
Catherine Wagley
The Rise
of the L.A.
Art Witch
Amanda Yates Garcia
Interview with
Mernet Larsen
Julie Weitz
Agnes Martin
at LACMA
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party Carla Issue 6
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Analia Saban
Ry Rocklen
Sarah Cain
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews:
Made in L.A. 2016
Doug Aitken Electric Earth
Mertzbau

Jean-Pascal Flavian and Mika Tajima
Mark A. Rodruigez
The Weeping Line
Molly Larkey, Aaron Horst,
Keith J. Varadi, Katie Bode,
Stuart Krimko, Matt Stromberg
Non-Fiction
at The Underground Museum
Catherine Wagley
The Art of Birth Carmen Winant
Escape from Bunker Hill
John Knight
at REDCAT
Travis Diehl
Ed Boreal Speaks Benjamin Lord
Art Advice (from Men) Sarah Weber
Routine Pleasures
at the MAK Center
Jonathan Griffin
Launch Party Carla Issue 5
Exquisite L.A.
Featuring:
Fay Ray
John Baldessari
Claire Kennedy
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Hana Cohn, Eli Diner,
Claire De Dobay Rifelj,
Katie Bode, Molly Larkey,
Keith J. Varadi
Moon, laub, and Love Catherine Wagley
Walk Artisanal Jonathan Griffin
Reconsidering
Marva Marrow's
Inside the L.A. Artist
Anthony Pearson
Mystery Science Thater
Diana Thater
at LACMA
Aaron Horst
Informal Feminisms Federica Bueti and Jan Verwoert
Marva Marrow Photographs
Lita Albuquerque
Launch Party Carla Issue 4
Interiors and Interiority:
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Char Jansen
Reviews Claire de Dobay Rifelj,
Matt Stromberg, Hana Cohn,
Lindsay Preston Zappas,
Simone Krug, Keith Vaughn,
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Le Louvre, Las Vegas Evan Moffitt
iPhones, Flesh,
and the Word
F.B.I.
at Arturo Bandini
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Women Talking About Barney Catherine Wagley
Lingua Ignota
Faith Wilding
at The Armory Center
for the Arts
and LOUDHAILER
Benjamin Lord
A Conversation
with Amalia Ulman
Char Jansen
How We Practice Carmen Winant
Launch Party Carla Issue 3
Share Your Piece of the Puzzle Federica Bueti
Amanda Ross-Ho Photographs
Erik Frydenborg
Reviews Eli Diner, Jonathan Griffin,
Don Edler, Aaron Horst
Hot Tears Carmen Winant
Slow View:
Molly Larkey
Anna Breininger and Kate Whitlock
Americanicity's Paintings
Orion Martin
at Favorite Goods
Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal
Layers of Leimert Park Catherine Wagley
Junkspace Junk Food
Parker Ito
at Kaldi, Smart Objects,
White Cube, and
Château Shatto
Evan Moffitt
Melrose Hustle Keith Vaughn
Reviews Benjamin Lord, Aaron Horst, Stephen Kent
Top-Down Bottom-Up Jenny Gagalka
Snap Reviews Aaron Horst, Char Jansen, Randy Rice, Lindsay Preston Zappas
Max Maslansky Photographs
Monica Majoli
at the Tom of Finland Foundation
White Lee, Black Lee
William Pope.L’s Reenactor
Travis Diehl
Dora Budor Interview Char Jensen
MEAT PHYSICS/
Metaphysical L.A.
Travis Diehl
Art for Art’s Sake:
L.A. in the 1990s
Anthony Pearson
A Dialogue in Two
Synchronous Atmospheres
Erik Morse
with Alexandra Grant
SOGTFO
at François Ghebaly
Jonathan Griffin
#studio #visit
with #devin #kenny
@barnettcohen
Mateo Tannatt
Photographs
Jibade-Khalil Huffman
VESSEL // CINS and
VESSEL // PERF
Ben Medansky
I've been a lot of places,
seen so many faces
Nora Slade
Launch Party Carla Issue 1
Slow View:
Discussion on One Work
Anna Breininger
with Julian Rogers
Reviews Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal, Catherine Wagley, Keith Vaughn, Aaron Horst, Kate Wolf, Mateo Tannatt, Evan Moffitt, Cal Siegel
We’re in This Together Lauren Cherry & Max Springer
Distribution
Downtown
ARTBOOK @ Hauser & Wirth
Baert Gallery
Cirrus Gallery
Château Shatto
Club Pro
Dalton Warehouse
Elevator Mondays
The Geffen Contemporary 
at MOCA
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ICA LA
LACA
MAMA
Mistake Room
MOCA Grand Avenue
Monte Vista Projects
Night Gallery
The Box
Wilding Cran Gallery
Boyle Heights/ Chinatown
A.G. Geiger
BBQLA
Chimento Contemporary
Charlie James
Human Resources
Ibid Gallery
Ooga Booga
Ooga Twooga
Parrasch Heijnen Gallery
Museum as Retail Space (MaRS)
Nicodim Gallery
Venus Over Los Angeles
Eastside
AWHRHWAR
67 Steps
ESXLA
Otherwild
SADE
Smart Objects
Skibum MacArthur
Westside
18th Street Arts
Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis 
College of Art and Design
Christopher Grimes Gallery
DXIX Projects
Five Car Garage
Team (Bungalow)
Pasadena/ Glendale/ Valley
The Armory Center for the Arts
The Pit
Los Angeles Valley College
Natural
The Art Gallery @ GCC
Mid-City
1301 PE
Big Pictures Los Angeles
California African American Museum
Chainlink Gallery
Commonwealth & Council
David Kordansky Gallery
H I L D E
JOAN
Kayne Griffin Corcoran
LACMA
ltd Los Angeles
Marc Foxx
Shoot the Lobster
Ochi Projects
Park View
Praz-Delavallade
The Landing
SPRÜTH MAGERS
The Underground Museum
USC Fisher Museum of Art
Visitor Welcome Center
Culver City
Anat Ebgi
Arcana Books
Blum & Poe
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Luis De Jesus
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Family Books
GAVLAK
Hannah Hoffman
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LA><ART
M+B
Nino Mier Gallery
Moskowitz Bayse
Noysky Projects
Regen Projects
Shulamit Nazarian
Various Small Fires
South Bay
DMV
Grab Bag Studios
The Torrance Art Museum
Elsewhere in CA
Alter Space (San Francisco)
City Limits (Oakland)
Et al. (San Francisco)
Ever Gold Projects (San Francisco)
fused space (San Francisco)
Gym Standard (San Diego)
Helmuth Projects (San Diego)
Interface Gallery (Oakland)
Jessica Silverman (San Francisco)
Left Field (San Luis Obispo)
San Diego Art Institute (San Diego)
Verve Center for the Arts (Sacramento)
Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art (San Francisco)
Non CA
Artbook @ MoMA PS1 (Long Island City, NY)
Editions Kavi Gupta (Chicago, IL)
Good Weather (North Little Rock, AK)
Nationale (Portland, OR)
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Skowhegan, ME)
Small Editions (Brooklyn, NY)
Space 42 (Jacksonville, FL)
Spoonbill & Sugartown (Brooklyn, NY)
Ulises (Philadelphia, PA)
Libraries/ Collections
Bard College, Center for Curatorial Studies Library (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY)
CalArts (Valencia, CA)
Cranbrook Academy of Art (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
El 123 (México City, MX)
John M. Flaxman Library at SAIC (Chicago, IL)
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Research Library (Los Angeles, CA)
Los Angeles Contemporary Archive (Los Angeles, CA)
Marpha Foundation (Marpha, Nepal)
Maryland Institute College of Art, The Decker Library (Baltimore, MD)
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library (New York, NY)
Midway Contemporary Art (Minneapolis, MN)
Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA)
Point Loma Nazarene University (San Diego, CA)
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, John M. Flaxman Library (Chicago, IL)
Scholes Library, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University (Alfred, NY)
Skowhegan Archives (New York, NY)
Sotheby’s Institute of Art (New York, NY)
Telfair Museum (Savannah, GA)
USC Fisher Museum of Art (Los Angeles, CA)
Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN)
Whitney Museum of American Art, Frances Mulhall Achilles Library (New York, NY)
Yale University Library (New Haven, CT)

Jason Rhoades
at Hauser & Wirth

Jason Rhoades, My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… (2004). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth and David Zwirner. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades was a quintessentially L.A. artist, whose sprawling, dense, visually cacophonous installations reflected Los Angeles’ hodgepodge urban aesthetics and consumer culture. Despite this, he was always more popular in Europe—exhibiting widely in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland—than in the city where he lived and worked. Presented 11 years after his untimely death at the age of 41, Hauser & Wirth’s career spanning survey Installations, 1994-2006 is something of a homecoming; the artist’s first major retrospective in his adopted hometown. It offers an opportunity to re-visit (or introduce) the work of an artist who has more often been talked about—lauded as heir to the lineage of Chris Burden and Mike Kelley—than seen in the United States.

The show opens with the earliest and tamest work on view, which caught the art world’s attention, setting Rhoades on his meteoric rise to art stardom. Produced the year after receiving his MFA from UCLA, Swedish Erotica and Fiero Parts (1994) established Rhoades as a master practitioner of what Jerry Saltz termed “clusterfuck aesthetics.” Piles of mundane objects litter the room: styrofoam, cardboard, pieces of wood, legal pads, and a recurring motif—the ubiquitous five gallon plastic bucket, Rhoades’ signature readymade. The unifying element in the work is the color yellow, which, in the original installation at Rosamund Felsen’s gallery, was based on the color of the building’s façade. The installation serves as a celebration of American consumerism, not based on luxury or wealth, but a kind of populist, big box materialism à la Ikea and Home Depot, one attainable to everyone. As with many of Rhoades’ works, Swedish Erotica has no center, no focus. It is up to viewers to find their way through the aisles between stacks of goods, attempting their own connections. You don’t so much look at the artwork as inhabit it, even if inhabiting proves somewhat futile.

My Brother / Brancusi from the following year revels in the kind of high/low dichotomy that was another common theme for Rhoades. A central assemblage combines wooden crates, small motorbikes, toy trucks, and industrial items, with stacks of donuts referencing Constantin Brancusi’s Endless Columns: icons of high modernism re-cast as junk food. The donuts also reference Rhoades’ brother’s desire to become rich from a donut business: Henry Ford by way of Homer Simpson. The walls are lined with photographs pairing Constantin Brancusi’s studio with the bedroom of Rhoades’ brother—one filled with modernist sculptures, the other with weight benches and aquariums, symbols of adolescent masculinity. It is a playful jab at the 20th century archetype of the heroic, male artist, proposing in its place a slacker, man-boy juvenility. Despite Rhoades’ ambition, it is a characterization that fits him, with his sophomoric enthusiasm, as well.

Jason Rhoades, My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… (2004). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth and David Zwirner. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Rhoades ratchets up his freewheeling, omnivorous exuberance with The Creation Myth (1998), a messy, orgiastic panorama of human thought and invention. Subtitled The Mind, the Body and the Spirit, the Shit, Prick and the Rebellious Part, the installation loosely resembles a figure composed of stacked tables, overhead projectors, video monitors, lights and all manner of detritus, generously decorated with pornographic images. On one end, a snake riding a toy train stands in as the figure’s scattered brain. On the opposite end, a large contraption representing an anus blows a smoke-ring every 15 seconds or so, the work’s only true site of production. The once noble act of creation is reduced to a fart joke.

These works confront the notion of the masterpiece, presenting instead an environment of everyday materials for the viewer to wander through—though the question remains whether they dismantle previous hierarchies, or simply shift them around. Is it really any less grandiose to pack a room with ephemeral objects than to craft a monument out of steel or concrete? Saltz’s “clusterfuck aesthetics” could be considered an artistic form of manspreading, and it’s not insignificant that most of its adherents were white male artists, challenging a previous generation’s hallowed works with their own brand of grand gestures.

The final three works included in the exhibition escalate Rhoades’ irreverence and repudiation of good taste, mixing sex, religion, and culture in a cheekily profane fusion that thumbs its nose at convention. In My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage… (2004), he creates a mosque-like setting, with a patchwork of towels on the floor in place of prayer mats, which viewers can only walk on once they have removed their shoes. As they gaze heaven-ward, they are confronted with a web of 240 neon signs overhead, each spelling out a slang word for female genitalia: Crotch Cobbler, Cock Alley, Woo-Woo. It reads like a blown-up, electric version of Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde—the 1866 painting of female genitalia—made by a puerile obsessive. It is indeed dazzling, at least in its execution, the scale of which is revealed by scores of orange power cords cascading down one wall, but it raises the question, as does so much of Rhoades work, of whether or not this smashing of taboos serves to challenge dominant systems or reinforce them. Work that was once perhaps seen as a liberating rebellion against staid mores, now seems retrograde in retrospect, simply enforcing patriarchal norms under a new guise.

Jason Rhoades, Tijuanatanjierchandelier (2006). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth, David Zwirner and lender. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

The last two works combine Rhoades’ linguistic, yonic obsession with his interest in consumerism, this time expressed on a global scale. Tijuanatanjierchandelier (2006) and The Black Pussy…and the Pagan Idol Workshop (2005) combine knick-knacks and tchotchkes from Mexico and Morocco with his jungle of neon signs. These are not “authentic” forays into other cultures—they’re not trying to be—but they showcase the marketplace crafts, hookahs, and cheap figurines that represent cultural collision in a way that museum artifacts cannot. To some, this smacks of a sort of superficial cultural appropriation, yet it reflects the same wide-eyed appreciation for mass-market material culture seen in all Rhoades’ work, here applied to the vaguely ethnic, off the shelf readymades of the tourist bazaar instead of Wal-Mart.

Despite his juvenile exuberance and sophomoric sense of humor, Jason Rhoades’ maximalist installations are not simple, easy works. At their best, they’re intensely personal and sincere epic constructions, drawing from a range of sources across the visual and material spectrums, dismissive of hierarchical distinctions. When ambition outpaces curiosity, however, they run the risk of simply being new manifestations of the old guard.

Jason Rhoades, Tijuanatanjierchandelier (2006). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth, David Zwirner and lender. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades, My Brother / Brancuzi (1995). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Private Collection, Switzerland. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades, The Creation Myth (1998). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Friedrich Christian Flick Collection im Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades, The Creation Myth (1998). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of Friedrich Christian Flick Collection im Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades, Swedish Erotica and Fiero Parts (1994). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth, Private Collection, Switzerland and lenders. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Jason Rhoades, Swedish Erotica and Fiero Parts (1994). Mixed media, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the estate, Hauser & Wirth, Private Collection, Switzerland and lenders. © The Estate of Jason Rhoades. Photo: Fredrik Nilsen.

Originally published in Carla Issue 8