Barely Living with Art:
The Labor of Domestic
Spaces in Los Angeles
Eli Diner
She Wanted Adventure:
Dwan, Butler, Mizuno, Copley
Catherine Wagley
The Languages of
All-Women Exhibitions
Lindsay Preston Zappas
L.A. Povera Travis Diehl
On Eclipses:
When Language
and Photography Fail
Jessica Simmons
Interview with
Hamza Walker
Julie Wietz
Reviews Cheyenne Julien
at Smart Objects

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
at team bungalow

Ravi Jackson
at Richard Telles

Tactility of Line
at Elevator Mondays

Trigger: Gender as a Tool as a Weapon
at the New Museum
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Launch Party November 18, 2017
at the Landing
Object Project
Featuring: Rosha Yaghmai,
Dianna Molzan, and Patrick Jackson
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Photos by Jeff McLane
Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA
Regen Projects
Ibid Gallery
One National Gay & Lesbian Archives and MOCA PDC
The Mistake Room
Luis De Jesus Gallery
the University Art Gallery at CSULB
the Autry Museum
Women on the Plinth Catherine Wagley
Us & Them, Now & Then:
Reconstituting Group Material
Travis Diehl
The Offerings of EJ Hill
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
Interview with Jenni Sorkin Carmen Winant
Letter to the Editor Lady Parts, Lady Arts
Launch Party August 19th at Blum and Poe
Object Project
Featuring: Rebecca Morris,
Linda Stark, Alex Olson
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Photos by Jeff McClane
Reviews Mark Bradford
at the Venice Biennale

Broken Language
at Shulamit Nazarian

Artists of Color
at the Underground Museum

Anthony Lepore & Michael Henry Hayden
at Del Vaz Projects


Analia Saban at
Sprueth Magers
Kanye Westworld Travis Diehl
@richardhawkins01 Thomas Duncan
Support Structures:
Alice Könitz and LAMOA
Catherine Wagley
Interview with
Penny Slinger
Eliza Swann
Exquisite L.A.
taisha paggett
Ashley Hunt
Young Chung
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Letter to the Editor
Launch Party May 13, 2017
at Commonwealth and Council
Reviews Alessandro Pessoli
at Marc Foxx

Jennie Jieun Lee
at The Pit

Trisha Baga
at 356 Mission

Jimmie Durham
at The Hammer

Parallel City
at Ms. Barbers

Jason Rhodes
at Hauser & Wirth
Catherine Wagley
Put on a Happy Face:
On Dynasty Handbag
Travis Diehl
The Limits of Animality:
Simone Forti at ISCP
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Ikechukwu Casmir Onyewuenyi
More Wound Than Ruin:
Evaluating the
"Human Condition"
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party February 18, 2017
at Shulamit Nazarian
Exquisite L.A.
Brenna Youngblood
Todd Gray
Rafa Esparza
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Creature
at The Broad

Sam Pulitzer & Peter Wachtler
at House of Gaga // Reena Spaulings Fine Art

Karl Haendel
at Susanne Vielmetter

Wolfgang Tillmans
at Regen Projects

at Chateau Shatto

The Rat Bastard Protective Association
at the Landing
Kenneth Tam
's Basement
Travis Diehl
The Female
Cool School
Catherine Wagley
The Rise
of the L.A.
Art Witch
Amanda Yates Garcia
Interview with
Mernet Larsen
Julie Weitz
Agnes Martin
Jessica Simmons
Launch Party Carla Issue 6
Exquisite L.A.
Analia Saban
Ry Rocklen
Sarah Cain
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Made in L.A. 2016
at The Hammer Museum

Doug Aitken
at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

at Tif Sigfrids

Jean-Pascal Flavian and Mika Tajima
at Kayne Griffin Corcoran

Mark A. Rodruigez
at Park View

The Weeping Line
Organized by Alter Space
at Four Six One Nine
(S.F. in L.A.)
at The Underground Museum
Catherine Wagley
The Art of Birth Carmen Winant
Escape from Bunker Hill
John Knight
Travis Diehl
Ed Boreal Speaks Benjamin Lord
Art Advice (from Men) Sarah Weber
Routine Pleasures
at the MAK Center
Jonathan Griffin
Launch Party Carla Issue 5
Exquisite L.A.
Fay Ray
John Baldessari
Claire Kennedy
Intro by Claressinka Anderson
Portraits by Joe Pugliese
Reviews Revolution in the Making
at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel

Carl Cheng
at Cherry and Martin

Joan Snyder
at Parrasch Heijnen Gallery

Elanor Antin
at Diane Rosenstein

Performing the Grid
at Ben Maltz Gallery
at Otis College of Art & Design

Laura Owens
at The Wattis Institute
(L.A. in S.F.)
Moon, laub, and Love Catherine Wagley
Walk Artisanal Jonathan Griffin
Marva Marrow's
Inside the L.A. Artist
Anthony Pearson
Mystery Science Thater:
Diana Thater
Aaron Horst
Informal Feminisms Federica Bueti and Jan Verwoert
Marva Marrow Photographs
Lita Albuquerque
Launch Party Carla Issue 4
Interiors and Interiority:
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
Char Jansen
Reviews L.A. Art Fairs

Material Art Fair, Mexico City

Rain Room

Evan Holloway
at David Kordansky Gallery

Histories of a Vanishing Present: A Prologue
at The Mistake Room

Carter Mull
at fused space
(L.A. in S.F.)

Awol Erizku
at FLAG Art Foundation
(L.A. in N.Y.)
Le Louvre, Las Vegas Evan Moffitt
iPhones, Flesh,
and the Word:
at Arturo Bandini
Lindsay Preston Zappas
Women Talking About Barney Catherine Wagley
Lingua Ignota:
Faith Wilding
at The Armory Center
for the Arts
Benjamin Lord
A Conversation
with Amalia Ulman
Char Jansen
How We Practice Carmen Winant
Launch Party Carla Issue 3
Share Your Piece
of the Puzzle
Federica Bueti
Amanda Ross-Ho Photographs
Erik Frydenborg
Reviews Honeydew
at Michael Thibault

Fred Tomaselli
at California State University, Fullerton

Trisha Donnelly
at Matthew Marks Gallery

Bradford Kessler
Hot Tears Carmen Winant
Slow View:
Molly Larkey
Anna Breininger and Kate Whitlock
Americanicity's Paintings:
Orion Martin
at Favorite Goods
Tracy Jeanne Rosenthal
Layers of Leimert Park Catherine Wagley
Junkspace Junk Food:
Parker Ito
at Kaldi, Smart Objects,
White Cube, and
Château Shatto
Evan Moffitt
Melrose Hustle Keith Vaughn
Reviews Mary Ried Kelley
at The Hammer Museum

Tongues Untied
at MOCA Pacific Design Center

No Joke
at Tanya Leighton
(L.A. in Berlin)
Top-Down Bottom-Up Jenny Gagalka
Snap Reviews Martin Basher at Anat Ebgi
Body Parts I-V at ASHES ASHES
Eve Fowler at Mier Gallery
Matt Siegle at Park View
Max Maslansky Photographs
Monica Majoli
at the Tom of Finland Foundation
White Lee, Black Lee:
William Pope.L’s "Reenactor"
Travis Diehl
Dora Budor Interview Char Jensen
Metaphysical L.A.
Travis Diehl
Art for Art’s Sake:
L.A. in the 1990s
Anthony Pearson
A Dialogue in Two
Synchronous Atmospheres
Erik Morse
with Alexandra Grant
at François Ghebaly
Jonathan Griffin
#studio #visit
with #devin #kenny
Mateo Tannatt
Jibade-Khalil Huffman
Ben Medansky
I've been a lot of places,
seen so many faces
Nora Slade
Launch Party Carla Issue 1
Slow View:
Discussion on One Work
Anna Breininger
with Julian Rogers
Reviews Pierre Huyghe

Mernet Larsen
at Various Small Fires

John Currin
at Gagosian, Beverly Hills

Pat O'Niell
at Cherry and Martin

A New Rhythm
at Park View

Unwatchable Scenes and
Other Unreliable Images...
at Public Fiction

Charles Gaines
at The Hammer Museum

Henry Taylor
at Blum & Poe/ Untitled
(L.A. in N.Y.)
We’re in This Together Lauren Cherry & Max Springer
ARTBOOK @ Hauser & Wirth
Baert Gallery
Cirrus Gallery
Château Shatto
Club Pro
Dalton Warehouse
Elevator Mondays
The Geffen Contemporary 
Ghebaly Gallery
Mistake Room
MOCA Grand Avenue
Monte Vista Projects
Night Gallery
The Box
Wilding Cran Gallery
Boyle Heights/ Chinatown
A.G. Geiger
Chimento Contemporary
Charlie James
Human Resources
Ibid Gallery
Ooga Booga
Ooga Twooga
Parrasch Heijnen Gallery
Museum as Retail Space (MaRS)
Nicodim Gallery
Ramiken Crucible

67 Steps
Smart Objects
Skibum MacArthur
18th Street Arts
Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis 
College of Art and Design
Christopher Grimes Gallery
DXIX Projects
Five Car Garage
Team (Bungalow)
Pasadena/ Glendale/ Valley
The Armory Center for the Arts
The Pit
Los Angeles Valley College
Odd Ark LA
1301 PE
Big Pictures Los Angeles
California African American Museum
Chainlink Gallery
Commonwealth & Council
David Kordansky Gallery
Karma International
Kayne Griffin Corcoran
ltd Los Angeles
Marc Foxx
Shoot the Lobster
Ochi Projects
Park View
The Landing
The Underground Museum
USC Fisher Museum of Art
Visitor Welcome Center
Culver City
Anat Ebgi
Arcana Books
Blum & Poe
Philip Martin Gallery
Honor Fraser
Klowden Mann
Luis De Jesus
Roberts Projects
Susanne Vielmetter
Diane Rosenstein
Family Books
Hannah Hoffman
Nino Mier Gallery
Moskowitz Bayse
Noysky Projects
Regen Projects
Shulamit Nazarian
Various Small Fires
South Bay
Grab Bag Studios
The Torrance Art Museum
Elsewhere in CA
Alter Space (San Francisco)
City Limits (Oakland)
Et al. (San Francisco)
Ever Gold Projects (San Francisco)
fused space (San Francisco)
Gym Standard (San Diego)
Helmuth Projects (San Diego)
Interface Gallery (Oakland)
Jessica Silverman (San Francisco)
Left Field (San Luis Obispo)
San Diego Art Institute (San Diego)
Verve Center for the Arts (Sacramento)
Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art (San Francisco)
Non CA
Artbook @ MoMA PS1 (Long Island City, NY)
Editions Kavi Gupta (Chicago, IL)
Good Weather (North Little Rock, AK)
Nationale (Portland, OR)
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Skowhegan, ME)
Small Editions (Brooklyn, NY)
Space 42 (Jacksonville, FL)
Spoonbill & Sugartown (Brooklyn, NY)
Ulises (Philadelphia, PA)
Libraries/ Collections
Bard College, Center for Curatorial Studies Library (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY)
CalArts (Valencia, CA)
Cranbrook Academy of Art (Bloomfield Hills, MI)
El 123 (México City, MX)
John M. Flaxman Library at SAIC (Chicago, IL)
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Research Library (Los Angeles, CA)
Los Angeles Contemporary Archive (Los Angeles, CA)
Marpha Foundation (Marpha, Nepal)
Maryland Institute College of Art, The Decker Library (Baltimore, MD)
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library (New York, NY)
Midway Contemporary Art (Minneapolis, MN)
Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA)
Point Loma Nazarene University (San Diego, CA)
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, John M. Flaxman Library (Chicago, IL)
Scholes Library, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University (Alfred, NY)
Skowhegan Archives (New York, NY)
Sotheby’s Institute of Art (New York, NY)
Telfair Museum (Savannah, GA)
USC Fisher Museum of Art (Los Angeles, CA)
Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN)
Whitney Museum of American Art, Frances Mulhall Achilles Library (New York, NY)
Yale University Library (New Haven, CT)

iPhones, Flesh, and The Word

F.B.I. at Arturo Bandini

F.B.I., (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

F.B.I. (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

If you were lucky enough to receive a text message invitation the day before, you may have found yourself at the opening for F.B.I., an eight person exhibition at Arturo Bandini, a parking-lot-cum-exhibition space. When I asked for a press release, the gallery co-founders responded with a rehearsed candid glib: “We don’t do press-releases, just text messages.” While this sort of invite-only exclusivity can be problematic, Bandini founders Michael Dopp and Isaac Resnikoff, have a pension for stunted, byte-sized poetic language. Exhibition titles such as Thank You PF Changs or Ansel Addams Family Values are punny and evocative and are surely part of this strategy. The title F.B.I. contains an evocative euphemism: Female Body Inspector. Combined with it’s more obvious reference to federal police forces, the title casts a gruesome flavor over the work presented, which happens to all include depictions of the body.

The 14 x 8 foot space is an impermanent outdoor/indoor hybrid structure. For F.B.I., a small pedestal appendage was added in the gallery’s iconic white stucco aesthetic to support Ken Tam’s sculptural torso work. The gallery’s body, like a starfish, looses or gains limbs, as needed, while its mass increases as more stucco—or “putz” as the gallerists are fond of calling it—gets slopped on after each exhibition; an aesthetic design of the architecture, but also a brilliantly convenient solution for wall patching. Its exterior walls are protected by a sizable overhang that supports the gallery’s dramatic fluorescents. It’s no accident that this lighting system improves the visual quality of the work exhibited when viewed online.[1] The gallery’s preferred mode of presentation caters to digital platforms like Instagram, so essential to creating and maintaining hype these days.

Kenneth Tam (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Kenneth Tam (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

That each Bandini experience starts with a smartphone is particularly pertinent to the works in F.B.I., which the curators dubbed “the body parts show.” Our smart phones are our secondary brains, extra appendages which we conveniently store in our back pockets. In his book Neomaterialism, Joshua Simon explains that our bodily connections to our electronic devices go beyond just the storage of mental information. He dubs our devices “self-portraits: …iPhones and iPads are dominated by shiny buttonless surfaces…The traces of our body on these screens and surfaces leave marks by our fingers and hands caressing and touching them.”[2] Our phones literally become depositories for pieces of ourselves: oils and body fats. Simon also discusses Apple’s brand mixture of temptation and knowledge manifested in their logo, which alludes to the forbidden fruit of Genesis. Similarly to Adam and Eve, who covered their bodies with fig leaves after realizing they were naked, we cover our iPhones with cases and protective layers. They are too fragile and erotic to be exposed.

Nik Gelormino (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Nik Gelormino (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Like Adam and Eve, post-original-sin, the bodies in F.B.I. seem to be coming to terms with their own sexuality, while also contending with their physical mortality. Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen’s digital photo collage, Granny Lingerie (2015), displays an alluring mix of covering and exposure. The piece greets visitors, and acts as a sort of emblem for the exhibition: two women wearing nude color masks pose over a background of breasts clad in a light pink Playtex bra. The women in the foreground stand awkwardly, the older of the two wearing orthopedic shoes and attempting an awkward contrapposto, while her youthful counterpart bends down into a half-squat. The distorted perceptual field of the photograph disrupts our notions of stable bodies, and instead flirts with our physical limitations. This is the body in various stages of health and decay.

Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen, Granny Lingerie (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Chanel Von Habsburg-Lothringen, Granny Lingerie (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Masks are a potent signifier elsewhere in the exhibition. Roni Shneior’s Candle Holder (2014) sits dismissed in the corner of the parking lot, as if it has been put in a time-out. The piece is a two-sided ceramic face from the upper lip down, its mouth agape on either side. A lit candle rests inside the head, and the piece is tilted so that molten wax dregs drip cum-like from the mouth on one side, and spew aggressively from the other. Akin to the mask’s ability to either conceal or heighten emotion, sexuality and banality meld into a seamless dichotomy, all installed atop a dusty paint-bucket-pedestal.

Roni Shneior, Untitled (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Roni Shneior, Candle Holder (2014). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Shana Lutker presents the body with a more fragmented and symbolic approach in Creation Matters (with Nosers) (2015). Flesh colored cartoonish ceramic noses—or are they phalluses?—are tacked atop a mirror whose vinyl text reads: Dear M., Creation Matters Little to Us. The title-case sentence reads like a title of a book or essay: a manifesto that rails against Creation, whether Biblical or artistic. The formal similarities between phallus and nose mirror both appendages’ ability to exert status and power (i.e., turning up one’s nose).

Shana Lutker, Creation Matters (with Nosers) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Shana Lutker, Creation Matters (with Nosers) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Inside the gallery space, was Roni Shneior’s Untitled (2015) robotic sculpture—a skin-colored oval mass outfitted with a blinking doll eye. The work’s stilted robotics are haunting and sad, like a post-traumatic All Seeing Eye. It emitted loud metronomic clicks like a calculated pacing device for moving through the exhibition. The monotonous sound ominously ticked away the time, like a reminder of our slow march towards death.

Roni Shneior (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Roni Shneior (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

Perhaps, though, the most palpable body in the exhibition was the gallery space itself. All the works in the show had to contend with and adhere to its back. It was in part due to Bandini’s monolithic/heroic architecture and harsh fluorescent lighting that the bodies in F.B.I. felt so abject. By comparison to Bandini’s fertile, pure, and stable surface, the bodies on view were limp, decaying, and caught in various stages of longing. If the artworks were collectively Eve, ashamed of her sexuality and aware of her changing body, Bandini was God, overbearing and omnipresent. In the beginning was the Word. And the Word was a text message.

F.B.I., (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

F.B.I. (installation view) (2015). Image courtesy of Arturo Bandini.

[1] A recent article in X-Tra tracked the upswing of digital art platforms like Artsy and Contemporary Art Daily, and the effects that normalizing our digital art viewing experience has had on many gallery environments, who are replacing traditional spot lighting with a more homogenized flourescent. João Enxuto and Erica Love, “Genetic Drift: Artsy and the Future of Art”, X-Tra, Winter 2015, Volume 17 Number 2. Print.

[2] Joshua Simon, Neomaterialism, Sternberg Press, 2013. P. 89-90

2016-07-12 (1)

Originally published in Carla Issue 3.